Vitamin Information

LEXICON

BETA-CAROTENE is the precursor of vitamin A, read more…

Beta-carotene is the precursor of vitamin A and is therefore also referred to as provitamin A.

The following groups of people may have higher beta-carotene requirements:
Children and adolescents.

Sources: Yellow, orange, red and dark-green vegetables and fruits, such as apricots, peaches and sea buckthorn berries, as well as carrots, squashes, broccoli and spinach.

BIOTIN is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Vitamin H, vitamin B7
Biotin (vitamin H – vitamin B7) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins.

The vitamin contributes to
– the maintenance of normal skin, hair and mucous membranes
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– normal macronutrient metabolism
– the normal function of the nervous system
– normal psychological functions

The following groups of people may have higher biotin requirements:
Pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Sources: Liver, soya products, nuts, rolled oats, vegetables and whole wheat.

CALCIUM is one of the major minerals. It is the most abundant mineral, read more…

Calcium is one of the major minerals. It is the most abundant mineral in the human body. Accordingly, sufficient quantities of calcium must be consumed daily. Ninety-nine per cent of the calcium in our bodies is deposited in the bones and teeth. However, in order to effectively absorb the calcium we consume, an adequate amount of vitamin D must be present.

The mineral calcium contributes to
– the maintenance of bones and teeth
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– normal blood clotting
– the normal function of digestive enzymes
– normal muscle function

The following groups of people may have higher calcium requirements:
Children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and athletes.

Sources: Milk and dairy products, vegetables such as kale and broccoli, nuts, berries and dried fruits.

COPPER is an essential trace mineral and supports human health, read more…

Copper is an essential trace mineral and supports human health in a multitude of ways.

The mineral copper contributes to
– the protection of cell constituents from oxidative stress
– normal function of the immune system
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– maintenance of normal connective tissues
– normal skin and hair pigmentation
– normal iron transport in the body

Sources: Shellfish, offal, whole-grain products, nuts, vegetables and bananas

FOLIC ACID is an essential B-complex vitamin, read more…

Folic acid is an essential B-complex vitamin. The vitamin plays a key role in all growth and development processes in the human body. Iron PLUSFolic acid (vitamin B9) is an essential B-complex vitamin. The vitamin plays a key role in all growth and development processes in the human body.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal blood formation
– normal cell division
– a normal function of the immune system
– normal maternal tissue growth during pregnancy
– normal psychological functions
– and can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher folic acid requirements:
Women who are planning a pregnancy, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Wheat germ, liver, yeasts, whole-grain products, green, leafy vegetables, nuts and egg yolk

IRON is one of the essential trace minerals, read more…

Iron PLUS SyrupIron is one of the essential trace minerals. Iron absorption in the body is increased when it is consumed together with vitamin C. Dairy products, coffee or black tea, on the other hand, impair iron absorption when ingested at the same time.

The mineral contributes to
– normal formation of red blood cells and haemoglobin
– normal oxygen transport in the body
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– normal cell division
– the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
– a normal function of the immune system
– normal cognitive function

The following groups of people may have higher iron requirements:
Children and adolescents, women, pregnant and breastfeeding women, athletes and vegetarians.

Sources: Liver, beef, lamb, seafood, whole-grain products, green, leafy vegetables and brewer’s yeast.

MAGNESIUM is a major mineral and, read more…

Magnesium is a major mineral and, as such, is present in the body in high concentrations. It performs a multitude of functions in the human organism. The mineral activates approx. 300 enzymes in the body.

The mineral magnesium contributes to
– the maintenance of normal bones and teeth
– normal energy metabolism
– muscle function
– normal cell division
– can contribute to a reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher magnesium requirements:
Pregnant and breastfeeding women

Sources: Plant-based foods, such as whole-grain products, vegetables, fruits and nuts, as well as mineral water and milk products.

MAGNESE is one of the essential trace minerals, read more…

Manganese is one of the essential trace minerals and is as part of the enzymes especially important for metabolism.

The mineral manganese contributes to
– the protection of cell constituents from oxidative stress
– maintenance of normal bone
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– the normal formation of connective tissue

Sources: pulses, nuts, rolled oats, spinach, kale and blueberries.

MICRONUTRIENTS comprise all substances, read more…

Micronutrients comprise all substances that the human body needs to survive.

MINERALS are inorganic substances required by the body, read more…

Minerals are inorganic substances required by the body for making complex molecules and substances and maintaining equilibrium in the body’s tissues and systems. Dietary minerals are classified as either major (macro) minerals or trace (micro) minerals. The body cannot produce minerals. Therefore, they must be obtained through dietary sources.

NIACIN is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, vitamin B3
Multivitamin Mineral Effervescent TabletsNiacin (nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, vitamin B3) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins and supports human health in a multitude of ways.

The vitamin Niacin contributes to
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– the normal function of the nervous system
– the maintenance of normal skin and mucous membranes
– the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

Sources: Beef, liver, brewer’s yeast, nuts, poultry and fish.

OMEGA-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fatty acids, read more…

The three types are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA).

The fatty acids DHA and EPA contribute to
– the normal function of the heart
– the maintenance of normal brain function
– the maintenance of normal vision
– to the maintenance of normal blood pressure

The following groups of people may have higher omega-3 fatty acid requirements:
Children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women.

Sources: Seafood, e.g. salmon, anchovies, sardines, mussels or shrimp, as well as vegetable oils, such as linseed oil, walnut oil and rapeseed oil.

PANTOTENIC ACID is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins and supports human health in a multitude of ways.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– the reduction of tiredness and fatigue
– normal mental performance

The following groups of people may have higher pantothenic acid requirements:
Pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Offal, fish, poultry, whole grains, yoghurt and vegetables.

VITAMIN B1 is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Vitamin B1 (thiamine) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins and supports human health in a multitude of ways.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal energy metabolism
– the normal function of the heart
– the normal function of the nervous system
– normal psychological functions

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin B1 requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Pork, whole-grain products, pulses, certain types of fish, like plaice and tuna, and potatoes.

VITAMIN B2 is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins and helps perform numerous functions in the human body.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– the protection of cell constituents from oxidative stress
– the maintenance of normal vision
– the maintenance of normal skin and mucous membranes
– the maintenance of normal red blood cells
– the maintenance of the normal function of the nervous system
– and can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin B2 requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Milk and dairy products, vegetables, beef and liver.

VITAMIN B6 is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins and helps perform numerous functions in the human body.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal function of the immune system
– the normal function of the nervous system
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– normal red blood cell formation
– normal psychological functions
– and can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin B6 requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Bananas, whole-grain products, poultry and potatoes.

VTAMIN B12 is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins, read more…

Vitamin B12 (cobalamin) is one of the water-soluble B-complex vitamins. This vitamin supports numerous processes in the body.

The vitamin contributes to
– normal red blood cell formation
– normal cell division
– normal energy metabolism
– a normal function of the immune system
– normal psychological functions
– and can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin B12 requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, vegetarians and elderly people.

Sources: Fish, meat, eggs, milk and dairy products and brewer’s yeast.

VITAMIN “B COMPLEX” refers to the group of B vitamins, read more…

The term “B complex” refers to the group of B vitamins. It comprises vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), niacin (vitamin B3), pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), biotin (vitamin B7 – vitamin H), folic acid (vitamin B9) and vitamin B12 (cobalamin). All B vitamins are water-soluble. Foods that are especially rich in B vitamins include whole-grain products, meat, offal, milk and dairy products.

VITAMIN C is one of the water-soluble vitamins, read more…

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is one of the water-soluble vitamins and, as an antioxidant, is involved in numerous body functions.

The vitamin contributes to
– a normal function of the immune system
– the protection of cell constituents from oxidative stress
– normal collagen formation
– the normal function of bones, teeth, cartilage, gums, skin and blood vessels
– the normal function of the nervous system
– normal energy-yielding metabolism
– and can contribute to the reduction of tiredness and fatigue

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin C requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women, athletes, elderly people and smokers.

Sources: Citrus fruits, kiwis, strawberries, potatoes, bell peppers, cruciferous vegetables and green, leafy vegetables.

VITAMIN D is a fat-soluble vitamin, read more…

Vitamin D (calciferol) is a fat-soluble vitamin that is produced primarily by the skin in the presence of sunlight (UVB rays). In this respect vitamin D differs from all other vitamins, which can be supplied primarily through the diet. It is particularly advisable to increase your dietary intake of vitamin D in the darker winter months, when the body has a limited ability to produce sufficient quantities of this vitamin.

The vitamin D contributes to
– the maintenance of normal bones and teeth
– normal absorption and utilisation of calcium
– normal cell division
– normal function of the immune system
– the maintenance of normal muscle function

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin D requirements:
Children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Liver, fatty fish, such as herring or salmon, and eggs

VITAMIN E is one of the fat-soluble vitamins, read more…

Vitamin E is one of the fat-soluble vitamins and, as an antioxidant, helps protect cell components from oxidative damage.

The following groups of people may have higher vitamin E requirements:
Adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Wheat germ, vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and whole-grain products.

ZINC is an essential trace mineral, read more…

Zinc is an essential trace mineral that is especially important for metabolism.

The mineral zinc contributes to
– normal carbohydrate metabolism
– normal protein synthesis
– to normal DNA synthesis and cell division
– a normal function of the immune system
– the maintenance of normal skin, hair and nails
– the protection of cell constituents from oxidative stress
– maintenance of normal bone

The following groups of people may have higher zinc requirements:
Children and adolescents, pregnant and breastfeeding women and elderly people.

Sources: Lean meat, poultry, eggs, dairy products and whole-grain products.